DETAILED DESIGN SHIP PROPELLERS

DETAILED DESIGN SHIP PROPELLERS. EN INGLES DISEÑO DE HELICES BUQUES

Editorial:
COLEGIO OFICIAL DE INGENIEROS NAVALES
Año de edición:
ISBN:
978-84-921750-3-1
Páginas:
528
Encuadernación:
paperback
Disponibilidad:
Disponible en 1 semana

69,00 €
Comprar

Detailed design of ship propellers


Autor: Gonzalo Pérez Gómez, Juan González-Adalid
Editorial: FEIN
Año de edición: 1.998
9788492175036
Encuadernación: cartoné
526 pág.
21,5 x 30,5 cm.
69,00€

Foreword

Preface

1. INTRODUCTION

2. DESCRIPTION OF THE CALCULATION PROCESS REQUESTED TO CARRY OUT THE DESIGN OF A PROPELLER
2.1. Introduction
2.2. Boundary conditions affecting to the design of a propeller
2.3. Selection of the propeller number of blades
2.4. Considerations on the propeller geometrical characteristics to be used as input in the propeller design process
2.5. Definition of the propeller loading radial distribution to be used as input in the propeller design process
2.6. Definition of the radial distribution of the circumferential mean values of the wake coefficients to be used as input in the propeller design process
2.7. Description of the iterative calculations procedure to be followed to reach the definitive geometry of the propeller

3. MATHEMATICAL MODELIZATION OF THE ACTION EXERTED BY THE PROPELLER ON THE SURROUNDED WATER
3.1. Introduction
3.2. Boundary conditions
3.3. Lifting line theory
3.4. The assumption that the propeller has a finite number of blades
3.5. The assumption that the propeller has a finite number of blades
3.6. Lifting surface theory
3.7. Panel methods
3.8. New momentum theory
3.9. Generalization of the new momentum theory
3.10. Considerations on the shape of the optimum loading radial distribution of a propeller
3.11. Estimation of the viscous resistance coefficient Cd corresponding to the propeller blade annular elements

CHAPTER 4. CALCULATION OF BOTH CAMBER AND ANGLE OF ATTACK OF THE PROPELLER BLADES ANNULAR SECTIONS. NEW CASCADES THEORY
4.1. Generalities
4.2. The assumption that each propeller blades annular section performs as if it belongs to a two-dimensional profile of infinite span with a transversal section equal to the developed contour of said propeller blades annular section
4.3. Corrections to the proceding developments to obtain both the three-dimensional camber-chord ratio and geometrical pitch angle corresponding to the propeller blades annular sections. Traditional point of view.
4.4. New cascades theory
4.5. Calculation of the E coefficient value corresponding to any propeller blades annular section of a CLT propeller.

CHAPTER 5. CALCULATION OF PROPELLER BLADES STRENGTH
5.1. Generalities
5.2. Basical hypothesis
5.3. Stresses due to pure traction effort
5.4. Stresses due to shear forces
5.5. Bending moment in the direction of minimum geometrical modulus
5.6. Spin moment
5.7. Normal stresses due to the bending moment
5.8. Tangential stresses due to spin moment
5.9. Von misses stresses
5.10. Stresses existing on the end plates of CLT propellers

CHAPTER 6. PROPELLER GEOMETRY. DEVELOPMENT OF CONSTRUCTIVE PROPELLER DRAWINGS
6.1. Introduction
6.2. Definitions and reference systems
6.3. Annular section seometry
6.4. Rake and skew
6.5. Mathematical definition for points on the propeller blade surface
6.6. Propeller drawing
6.7. Anti-singing edges, tree trunk and other propeller geometrical details
6.8. Controllable pitch propeller drawings

CHAPTER 7. EVALUATION OF THE PROPELLER OPEN WATER EFFINIENCY IN A PRELIMINARY STAGE OF THE PROPELLER DESIGN
7.1. Introduction
7.2. Equivalent profile theory
7.3. Prediction of ship performance with a propeller designed to absorb a certain power at a given revolutions rate using doctors oosterveld and van oossanen polynomial expression of Kt and Kq coefficients of marin B series
7.4. Prediction of ship performance with a propeller designed to absorb a certain power at a given revolutions rate using the new momentum theory in association with the equivalent profile theory
7.5. Application example of the preceding developments
7.6. Preliminary design of propellers to be fitted on tugs and trawlers

CHAPTER 8. OPTIMIZATION OF THE PROPULSIVE EFFICIENCY OF A SHIP
8.1. Introduction
8.2. Deduction of the analytical expression of the propulsive efficiency of a ship
8.3. Solutions endeavour to reduce the thrust deduction coefficient (t)
8.4. Solutions endeavour to increase the wake fraction (w)
8.5. Solutions endeavour to recover energy of the propeller wake
8.6. Solutions endeavour to increase the relative rotative efficiency
8.7. Solutions endeavour to improve the propeller open water efficiency acting on the propeller design power and revolutions
8.8. Solutions endeavour to improve the propeller open water efficiency acting on the propeller loading radial distribution
8.9. Remarks

CHAPTER 9. THE DESIGN OF SPECIAL PROPELLERS
9.1. Introduction
9.2. Controllable pitch propellers
9.3. Nozzle propellers
9.4. CLT propellers
9.5. Contrarotating and tandem propellers

CHAPTER 10. PREDICTION OF THE CAVITATION DEVELOPMENT ON THE PROPELLER BLADES ANNULAR SECTIONS
10.1. Introduction
10.2. Introduction to the experimental study of the cavitation phenomena
10.3. Arguments on some of the existing procedures to carry out cavitation tests
10.4. Most frequent types of cavitation
10.5. Some requirements that must be satisfied by the ship hull afterbody lines to avoid that a harmful cavitation be developed on the propeller
10.6. Calculation of cavitation extension on propellers blades annular sections
10.7. Use of incipient cavitation curves corresponding to profiles which geometry is obtained by superposition of a mean line and a thickness distribution
10.8. Influence of the cavitation on the Cl and Cd coefficients of the propeller blades annular sections

CHAPTER 11. PREDICTION OF THE PERFORMANCE OF A PROPELLER WITH KNOWN GEOMETRY INSIDE A VELOCITIES FIELD WITH AXIAL AND TANGENTIAL COMPONENTS VARYING BOTH RADIALLY AND CIRCUMFERENTIALLY
11.1. Introduction
11.2. Conventional propellers operating inside a unidirectional and uniform velocities field
11.3. CLT propellers operating inside a unidirectional and uniform velocities field
11.4. Propellers operating inside a velocities field with axial and tangential components varying both radially and circumferentially.

APPENDIX A. GENERAL EQUATIONS OF THE THREE.DIMENSIONAL MOTIONS OF INCOMPRESSIBLE IDEAL FLUIDS
A1. Introduction
A2. Bernouilli theorem
A3. Momentum theorem
A4. Kinetic moment theorem
A5. Vorticity
A6. Vorticity variations
A7. Kutta-Joukowsky theore

APPENDIX B. SOLUTION OF INCOMPRESSIBLE, POTENTIAL, IDEAL FLOW EQUATIONS
B1. Introduction
B2. Harmonic functions
B3. Harmonic vectors
B4. Dirichlet and newmann problems
B5. Definition of the potential velocity field by means of vortex distributions
B6. Definitions of the potential velocity field by means of skins, sources and doublets
B7. General solution of the equations of potential motions of the incompressible ideal fluids
B8. Generalities on the numerical procedures wich must be used for the resolutions of incompressible, potential and ideal flow equations

APPENDIX C. MOTIONS OF INCOMPRESSIBLE IDEAL FLUIDS AROUND TWO-DIMENSIONAL WINGS
C1. Introduction
C2. Thin wings
C3. Thick wings
C4. Some useful information